• Mordecai M. Kaplan (1881-1983) was one of the most influential Jewish thinkers of the 20th century.  We believe that his thought may be even more important in the 21st century.

One Jewish Evanston - Shavuot 2016/5776

Here is how good and how pleasant it is when brothers and sisters gather together in unity.  (From Psalm 133.)

 

Ki gerim heyyitem b'eretz Mitzrayim:

For you were strangers/sojourners/refugees/non-conformists/converts? in the land of Egypt”

All are welcome to join us on Saturday evening, June 11, 2016, beginning at 7:00 p.m., as multiple Evanston communities will again join together under the banner of “One Jewish Evanston,” to mark the end of Shabbat and to celebrate the beginning of Shavuot.

The evening will feature, in addition to Shavuot evening services and good food, a Tikkun Leyl Shavuot (an evening-long series of learning sessions) with some of the best teachers anywhere, selected by each of the participating communities.  The learning will focus on a phrase that appears repeatedly in the Torah, “Ki gerim heyyitem b'eretz Mitzrayim: For you were strangers/sojourners/refugees/non-conformists/converts? in the land of Egypt”.  We will explore various aspects and interpretations of this phrase, particularly as they relate to the experience at Sinai that is central to the celebration of Shavuot.

The full schedule for the evening is available by clicking here.

Feel free to join us for all or part of the program.  Advance registration is required, but you need to pay for the event if and only if you will be joining us for dinner after services.  

For more information, please call Dan Cedarbaum at 847-492-5200 or e-mail him at dan@kaplancenter.org.           

One Jewish Evanston is sponsored by The Mordecai M. Kaplan Center for Jewish Peoplehood. Based in Evanston, the Kaplan Center is an independent organization devoted to the transformation of Jewish community.  Its mission is to disseminate and promote the thought and writings of Rabbi Kaplan and to advance the agenda of the Kaplanian approach to Judaism in the 21st century, perhaps most importantly by spurring creative experimentation in the formation or reorganization of various kinds of Jewish communities and institutions.  The Kaplan Center’s perspective is explicitly trans-denominational.